Decentralising

28/07/2017

The Party for Capitalist Economy stands for decentralizing. For the last few years, the trend has been to centralize everything- grant of subsidies directly to the consumers from the central government, admission of students to certain professional courses, deciding quantum of taxes to be collected by the state governments etc. Even the state governments are taking decisions on behalf of private institutes and individuals like fees to be charged by schools from students, cutting trees, age at which one should marry, age at which one should go for jobs etc. The Party for Capitalist Economy thinks that decision taking should be decentralized- Central and state governments should resist the temptation to have more powers and allow private individuals and institutions to decide. There appears to be a need for All India parties like BJP and Congress as well as other parties to debate on the pros and cons of centralizing power.

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Production and yield of rice(paddy) in India and neighboring countries

17/07/2017

Production and yield of rice(paddy) in India and neighbouring countries during the year 2014, as per Food and Agriculture Organisation(FAO) are given below.

Country area harvested(HA) Production(tonnes) yield(tonnes)

China (mainland) 30,300,870 206,507,400 6.81
Bangladesh 11,319,490 52,325,620 4.62
Myanmar 6,790,000 26,423,300 3.89
Sri Lanka 881,000 3,381,000 3.84
Bhutan 20,359 76,621 3.76
India 43,855,000 157,200,000 3,58
Nepal 1,486,951 5,047,047 3.39
Pakistan 2,890,646 7,002,832 2.42

Yield in India is just a little over half of the yield in China and much less than that of Bangladesh. The main reason for low yield is shortage of water. For increasing yield, irrigation should be increased. Government has no control over rainfall but has the capability for maximum utilization of surface and ground water. The state and central governments should immediately start work on linking rivers in the country not only for purposes of irrigation but also to manage floods.

If India’s yield of food grains is as much as that of China, world hunger could be wiped out completely.


Foreign Policy of India – success or failure

06/07/2017

How does one assess whether the foreign policy of India in recent years is a success or failure? If we go by the number of Indian VVIPs’ visits abroad or foreign VVIP’s visits to India, India’s foreign policy is a success. But mere visits and signing of agreements do not necessarily mean success or failure. Success of foreign policy also cannot be concluded by the number of international organizations in which the country becomes a member or of which the country is a co-founder. Common approach to or identity of views on international issues also do not mean success of foreign policy. Extending assistance, grants and loans to other countries through various programmes or Eximbank etc also does not mean the foreign policy is a success. Successful foreign policy should lead to expansion of the country’s exports, industrial, technical and scientific cooperation between the countries,spreading of Indian culture, increased arrivals of foreign visitors, creation of interest in foreign countries in India’s history, culture. languages, way of life etc.

Foreign policy should also not be under the control of only the Ministry of External Affairs. The inputs from other Ministries of the union and from the states should also be solicited and considered carefully.